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Poster [clear filter]
Friday, July 20
 

8:00am

Coping with Mediocrity: Working with Less-than-Great Assignments
Close your eyes and imagine this: You check your email and there’s a request for a library session - maybe it’s from a new faculty member you haven’t worked with before. In their request, they drop all the right words – “research”, “exploration” “critical thinking” – and they remembered to attach the assignment. You’re impressed and start to get excited about this collaboration. You begin to jot down some ideas, but then you remember that you need to at least look at the assignment first, and that’s when your excitement fizzles. The assignment is mediocre, and now you have to plan an engaging, informative, and useful workshop based on it. Sound familiar?

The presenter, an ESL teacher-turned-librarian with ten years of college-level instruction experience, will use her unique perspective to give targeted, actionable ideas for staying sane and maintaining enthusiasm when planning one-shot sessions based on unexceptional assignments. The examples used will focus on first-year writing assignments, but the ideas will be applicable to other disciplines and levels as well. Participants will leave with ideas for turning second-rate assignments into fantastic one-shots.

Presenters

Friday July 20, 2018 8:00am - 9:30am
University Center 213

8:00am

Dream Big! Developing and Sustaining Embedded Librarianship within a Campus Resource Center
Located within the main campus library, the Titan Dreamers Resource Center (TDRC) at California State University, Fullerton is proud to serve and support undocumented students. Program and workshop offerings are included as part of its mission. Feeling the library could do more to support this vulnerable population, the TDRC librarian liaison expanded research and instruction support of the center through collaboration with the center’s staff and student leads, weekly office hours (a.k.a. “Pop Up Library”), and tailored workshops on various topics. The embedded nature of the liaison role required intensive outreach efforts from the outset. The initial success of outreach and strengthening relationships with staff members was critical to the expansion of supportive interventions. From the beginning and throughout, establishing and maintaining a presence both online and in-person through the center’s email newsletter, signage, word of mouth marketing, an updated LibGuide, and other announcements helped ensure the library’s resources, including librarian intervention, remained visible and accessible. Based upon feedback from attendees at introductory “get to know your librarian” presentations, additional workshops on finding peer-reviewed sources and government resources were given. Ultimately, these initial and ongoing efforts have helped lay the groundwork for consistent and well-attended workshops on various topics.

After attending this poster session, attendees will acquire a greater understanding of how to support vulnerable student populations through embedded librarianship, expand workshop offerings outside the traditional one-shot classroom setting, and maintain a proactive service model to meet specific needs.

Presenters
avatar for Jonathan Cornforth

Jonathan Cornforth

Reference & Instruction Librarian, California State University, Fullerton


Friday July 20, 2018 8:00am - 9:30am
University Center 213

8:00am

Exploring Social Issues, Information Privilege, and Incarceration with Sociology Students
Students in a Sociology course at a community college investigated social issues with their professor throughout the semester, selecting one to pursue in relation to prisoners. The students attended a library instruction session to locate academic articles related to research questions they developed. These curated sources were meant to be shared with future students who take the same class, including inmates. This unique class assignment required discussions about information privilege as it relates to the access to information inmates have in general, compared to students in academia as well as non-students. Open Access was compared to traditional publishing models and copyright issues were explored. Connections to the ACRL Framework, key takeaways from the experience, and future plans will be presented.

Presenters
avatar for Jamie Dwyer

Jamie Dwyer

Instruction and Liaison Librarian, Salt Lake Community College
Jamie is an Instruction and Liaison Librarian at Salt Lake Community College, where she works with the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. She also teaches sand volleyball for SLCC over the summer. | Jamie will have a poster session (Exploring Social Issues, Information Privilege... Read More →



Friday July 20, 2018 8:00am - 9:30am
University Center 213

8:00am

Facilitating conversations across institutions: The annual summer unconference @ UW Libraries
Since 2011, the University of Washington Libraries Teaching and Learning Group has organized an annual summer unconference for librarians around the Puget Sound. An unconference is participant-driven, with activities loosely designed to take maximum advantage of the experience, curiosity, and needs of participants with a focus on teaching and learning. Rather than sessions being determined in advance, attendees create discussion groups on the spot depending on their interests. We try to choose a theme that is topical and broad enough to generate discussion in many different contexts. We always have several rounds of roundtable discussions, but mix up the framing events most years to keep it interesting and relevant. Some examples of activities are lightning talks, keynotes, a panel, and a technology petting zoo.

As the conference has grown, we have developed partnerships with Central Washington University and the Association of Librarians of the University of Washington to help plan and run the event. The 2017 conference theme is Critical Librarianship in Practice, and for the first time we are at capacity with 90 registrants and waiting list. The unconference is a valuable experience because it allows librarians to connect with others at different institutions in a low-cost, friendly, and active environment. As one attendee mentioned in post-unconference survey “I learned so much and made great connections w/librarians I had never met.”



Friday July 20, 2018 8:00am - 9:30am
University Center 213

8:00am

Growing Library Presence and Information Literacy beyond the One-Shot: The NINJA Project
The limitations of one-shot library instruction have birthed innovative techniques by librarians that include the use of embedding and flipped-learning models. The implementations of these techniques requires buy-in from and relationship-building with the teaching faculty, with variables that fluctuate widely between disciplines, personalities, and teaching styles. Through a collaboration that aimed to emphasize the research process in an Argumentation & Debate course, a liaison librarian and Communication Studies faculty member developed a playful approach to the research process that also informs the process of moving one-shot library instruction into more engaged models. The original concept, which uses the acronym “NINJA”, guides students through research from navigating a topic to appraising their final product. When the approach is applied to embedding librarianship, the same steps act as a roadmap in the adventure of collaborating with any teaching faculty in order to more fully integrate library services and information literacy into their courses. Attendees will be able to adapt this model to navigate the variety of settings, tools, and methods that librarians and faculty may consider in meeting this end. Additional materials for attendees will be posted online.


Friday July 20, 2018 8:00am - 9:30am
University Center 213

8:00am

Information Literacy: From a Standalone Class to General Education Integration
Dixie State University has had a standalone, required, credit based information literacy class for more than ten years. Faculty librarians and departmental faculty have noticed that students are not learning the research process and evaluation of information techniques at the time of need, therefore the students are not retaining the information. While working with the General Education (GE) Taskforce, tasked with the goal of campus wide GE reform, it was concluded that creating modules of information in both the Canvas (learning management software) and LibGuides would be an ideal way to provide ready to go lessons for faculty across disciplines. We will provide information about our planning process, methods for successfully working with faculty throughout the campus community, and the results of our spring 2018 beta test of this method. Resources are intended to be supplemented by librarian instruction or as standalone learning modules for faculty that are more experienced in teaching research skills. As development progresses, we will scaffold the research process and searching techniques to range from general education to senior capstone.

Presenters
avatar for Dianne Aldrich

Dianne Aldrich

Public Services Librarian, Dixie State University
Dianne Aldrich lives in southern Utah with her husband and three children. She is an associate professor/public services librarian and has been working for Dixie State University in Saint George, Utah, for the last 10 years. Her main areas of focus are interlibrary loan as well as... Read More →


Friday July 20, 2018 8:00am - 9:30am
University Center 213

8:00am

More Than Just Stories: Merging Oral History, Library Instruction, and the ACRL Frameworks
Traditionally, students wrote lengthy, research-laden term papers. Nowadays students are designing and presenting multi-modal projects using the latest technologies. They are still doing the research but creating videos and podcasts as final projects instead of term papers. Many classes now require students to interview people, classmates or others in the community, for their project. This interview format serves as a perfect opportunity to blend Library Instruction sessions with Outreach provided by Oral Historians from Special Collections. Using my expertise in instructional design and her expertise in oral history we designed a library instruction session centered on two ACRL Frameworks: Information Creation as Process and Scholarship as Conversation. Students are frequently subjected to interviews in the media but do they know how to create a “good” interview? Do they know how to draft appropriate open-ended questions? By researching, interviewing, and using the triangulation process students will develop the skills to recognize as well as to create good oral histories. They will be able to identify their role with collective memory as well as their agency as scholarly contributor instead of just consumer.

Presenters
avatar for Elizabeth DeZouche

Elizabeth DeZouche

Visiting Instruction Librarian, The College of William & Mary


Friday July 20, 2018 8:00am - 9:30am
University Center 213

8:00am

So you want to start an exhibits program at your library
Starting an exhibits program at your library sounds like an easy and fun way to engage users with your collections. Reserving the exhibits space for student-led programming can be a way foster independent research and to facilitate collaboration between students and librarians. Unexpected challenges arise when an instruction librarian advocates for a student-led exhibits case in the library and gets what she asked for. This poster will present lessons learned, missteps and successes from the first year of our exhibits program, including the ins and outs of purchasing an exhibits case, writing policies and procedures and collaborating across the library to build a vibrant and compelling space for students to engage and teach with our collections. I’ll also share next steps and goals for the program.

Presenters
EN

Elise Nacca

Head, Information Literacy, The University of Texas at Austin


Friday July 20, 2018 8:00am - 9:30am
University Center 213

8:00am

Why not take a scientific approach to teaching information literacy skills?
Do you want to be a better teacher? Do you want help improving your instruction, but fear letting a colleague see what happens in your classes? Are you required to have your instruction sessions evaluated by a colleague or a supervisor? This poster shows how to use two nationally calibrated tools, modified for information literacy instruction, to make your lessons more engaging. These tools, the Teaching Practices Inventory-Information Literacy Instruction (TPI-ILI) and the Classroom Observation Tool for Information Literacy (COPIL), are based on the best pedagogical evidence we have about how we learn. The original tools – Teaching Practices Inventory (TPI) and Classroom Observation Protocol for Undergraduate STEM (COPUS) – were developed to improve teaching through high impact evidence-based practices. 
 
This poster will give you a short background about the importance of active learning for helping all students, especially minorities, succeed in a classroom. We will consider how to apply COPIL and the TPI-ILI to our one-off information literacy sessions, and how to adopt techniques developed from an inventory of effective teaching to improve our own instruction.  
 
The TPI-ILI in combination with the classroom observation model COPIL creates two legs of a peer coaching program. The process results in a mix of qualitative and quantitative data about what you and your students are doing. Armed with this information you can see what currently takes place in the classroom, what is working, and where you have room for improvement. More significantly, the data we collected with these tools helps demonstrate our value to education.  

Presenters
avatar for Kristin Buxton

Kristin Buxton

Science Librarian, University of Oregon
avatar for Mary K. Oberlies

Mary K. Oberlies

Undergraduate Engagement Librarian, University of Oregon


Handout docx

Friday July 20, 2018 8:00am - 9:30am
University Center 213
 


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